Deterioration in the Central African Republic

Deterioration in the Central African Republic

[column col=”1/2″]The situation in the Central African Republic has escalated quickly since November 2012; we now face more than a million internally displaced persons, thousands of deaths due to sectarian violence, a collapse of the political system and the most urgent humanitarian concerns.

Central African Republic It is imperative that the Security Council addresses this issue. At the moment of writing, the sectarian violence is worsening by the day. Christian and Muslim militias arm themselves and more occurrences of deadly encounters between the groups see the news. The spill-over effect into neighbouring countries such as Chad and (South) Sudan is very real and the stability of the whole region is at stake. Even though the most pressing concerns in the international community seem to focus on the fear of a genocide taking place and immediate humanitarian relief, the Security Council should also embark on addressing the underlying roots of the conflict. Political legitimacy, economic inequality and most and foremost access and control over natural resources are constant factors that make the situation in the Central African Republic a very difficult and worrisome one.

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[column col=”1/2″]The Central African Republic has throughout its short independent existence seen many conflict and violence. During its many years of unrest the international community has often looked the other way; letting the people of CAR fend for itself. But the situation nowadays has deteriorated into a highly undesirable situation, not only the this country, but for the entire region. As the bloodshed causes people to flee their home which creates a logistical nightmare for the surrounding countries, who are faced with large numbers of refugees crossing their borders.

This years’ Security Council of GrunnMUN is asked to: on the one hand find a suitable reaction to the escalating violence in the country and, on the other hand, to try to lay the groundwork for a more durable resolution for this apparent intractable conflict so that these people can return to their homes.

– Annemarie Stomp and Edwin Slingerland (Chairs of the Security Council)
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